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La-La-Lambrusco!

La-La-Lambrusco!

Cantina di Carpi e Sorbara Ommagio a Gino Friedmann Lambrusco di Sorbara  2014 review

Cantina di Carpi e Sorbara Omaggio a Gino Friedmann Lambrusco di Sorbara 2014
Emilia-Romagna, Italy
$15.95

I’m back! Did you miss me? The last month has been a crazy whirlwind of heat stroke and writing for other people, and sure I’ve been drinking tons of wine but a lot of it wasn’t actually available in the LCBO, some of it wasn’t worth sharing, and some of it was drunk in such haste that I couldn’t remember much about it.

I’m sorry. Let’s never be apart for so long again. Not when there’s so much deliciousness to be had!

So let's get back into it with this special (and sorta rare) treat: Lambrusco.

Most of you have never heard of Lambrusco, I’d imagine. For some reason the LCBO doesn’t bring in very much of this delicious, refreshing, fruity, sparkling little red number (although there is one on the General List that I keep meaning to try even though it’s on the sweeter side of the Lambrusco spectrum). It’s kinda weird considering Lambrusco goes so well with everyone’s favourite foods: pizza and salami.

So what it is? Well, because Italian wine is often super confusing, the name Lambrusco actually refers to both the wine and the grape. It also gets broken down into a few designated regions (DOCs), based on geography and production rules. But at its most essential, Lambrusco is a fizzy red wine from north-central Italy that's delicious and meant to be drunk young and cold with joy in your heart and food on your plate.

Actually, I've got a fun fact for you guys. Parma and Reggiano both fall under the Lambrusco designation. You know what else they make in Parma and Reggiano? Aged hams and cheeses! Both of which pair beautifully with Lambrusco because if the saying “what grows together goes together” is true anywhere in the world, it’s Italy. Which really makes the life of a somm that much easier, amiright?

There are a few different clones of the Lambrusco grape (this one's the Sorbara clone), and a few different styles, so definitively defining the wine is tough. It can range from sweet to super dry, fruity to savoury, with varying levels of fizz. And it’s a real shame that we don’t see enough in Ontario to fully experience the diversity. They’re all worth trying, though. So if you see one on a list, order a glass and let me know how it was.

This bottle, I gotta say, is amazing. It was probably a million degrees last night, and it went down like a treat. And the pepperoni pizza I paired it with was just perfection. There’s not a lot of this left in the LCBO so if you like a sparkling red as much as I do, run don’t walk to grab a bottle.

Oh, and did I mention it’s under 12% alcohol – lunch wine, anyone?

Nose: Red fruits, fizzy yeastiness, some citrus.
Palate: I don’t even know where to start with this wine. It was tasty from first sip to last gulp. All strawberries and cherries and delicious summer fruits with a spritz of lemon zest, then by the second glass this weird bergamot-like citrus thing showed up and strutted around. And by the time we were done with it, suddenly there was a little blood orange doing a dance with those strawberries and I was just down and out. It’s so good. There was plenty of acidity and a bit of savouryness, which the fatty pizza and zippy sausage played so well with. And the bubbles, oh the bubbles! There is nothing I like so much as a cold sparkling wine on a hot summer’s eve, I have to say. My husband and I might’ve finished the bottle in under an hour. We might not have. But all I know is, I need more.

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